Ron Jordan

Ron at Isla Espiritu, BajaAs a young child I found myself completely intrigued by the photographic process. Back then I spent time in the hallway bathroom of my modest childhood home mixing chemicals in the dark like a small, but dangerous, mad scientist - anxiously awaiting the painstakingly gradual revelation of the hidden images coming forth on the soaking photo paper. In those early days it was all about the science of photography for me, and not so much about the art.

But an ember was sparked; I loved the concept of freezing a fleeting moment in time and then memorializing it virtually for eternity. Later in life as a U.S. Marine, I found myself in faraway lands exploring 'every climb and place' with film and camera in hand more often than with a rifle. Now that the digital SLR has been perfected, it is my weapon of choice (although I do still have my trusty Canon A1 film camera).

At first glance, when taken as a whole, my work may appear to be more diversified than would seem easily to fit into a traditional nature category. In spite of this, I completely regard myself as a nature photographer, with a caveat. In addition to the more typically recognized subject matter commonly associated with nature photography (wildlife and traditional scenic landscapes, for example), I include the overarching world of physics as a legitimate component of the natural world. Rather than simply photographing nature in the conventional sense, when I look through my viewfinder I try to observe, discover, capture, and exhibit the very nature of things within the world we inhabit - wherever it takes me.

Aristotle once said, “[i]n all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.” I think he was very insightful in this, and searching for that bit of the marvelous is what drives me in my photography. My primary goal on every fine art piece I have ever created was to somehow find something difficult to observe and then capture it in a way that allows my audience a perspective they might never otherwise realize if not for the art and science of photography, and the adventurous nature of my own eye.

My personal photographic adventurism sometimes leads to the depiction of motion, or exposing invisible forces of physics in ways that might seem more eclectic when considered within the normal paradigm of 'Nature Photography.' But whom, if not a nature photographer, could capture such amazing content, so that all can enjoy a little 'something of the marvelous,' about which Aristotle spoke?

It is because of this goal that my photographic work often ventures into atypical nature subjects. While it is true that I photograph a great variety of wildlife and scenic landscapes, in doing so, I try to depict something more elusive, such as unusual animal behavior, the hint of movement, a unique perspective, or perhaps a fascinating juxtaposition. My goal is always to capture and exploit something uncommon for the viewer. I subscribe to a theory that I do not inspire anyone with my photography; however, through my photography people can be truly inspired by nature. In the end, as a photographer I think I am purely an exhibitionist who seeks to gently awaken the voyeur in each of us by tempting the viewer with the promise of something hidden beneath the surface.